kendrajbean:

Calling all Vivien Leigh and/or Laurence Olivier fans, Anglophiles, English people, Londoners:

Durham Cottage, Vivien and Laurence Olivier’s love nest in Chelsea, London, was auctioned off today. As it isn’t a Grade Listed building (it’s old and has obvious historic value, so why it’s not listed is beyond me), it runs the risk of being drastically remodeled, or worse, demolished. 

It may be too late to do anything, but please sign this petition to ask English Heritage to intervene with a temporary grade listing. 

Even if you have no idea who Vivien Leigh or Laurence Olivier were, this building has historical value. Plus, it’s a colorful and quirky gem in a sea of brownstone near the Chelsea Royal Hospital. Please add your name to the list!

Thanks!

- Kendra Bean

Vivien Leigh biographer/Fan

5 hours ago 27 notes


9th
July
45 notes
Reblog
2 weeks ago 45 notes


9th
July
80 notes
Reblog
Vivien’s eyebrow “problem”   “Now take Vivien Leigh. I worked on the first screen test ever shot of her in London. I worked with Alexander Korda on it. After Korda looked at the test, he came to me and said something was crooked on her face. Finally he discovered it was her eyebrows. One was arched and the other straight. 'Why don't you make them both straight?' he wanted to know.   I told him I hadn’t, and I wouldn’t, because the unbalanced brows made her face more interesting. Moreover they were natural. She had a habit of lifting one brow, which arched it. And I wanted it to remain that way. It wasn’t perfection — but it gave her a fine impish quality. Finally Korda agreed.   And between us, don’t you think Vivien Leigh looks all right these days? And those eyebrows are still crooked! Frequently little irregularities like these can be turned into assets.” (Guy Pearce, make-up artist)

Vivien’s eyebrow “problem”

   “Now take Vivien Leigh. I worked on the first screen test ever shot of her in London. I worked with Alexander Korda on it. After Korda looked at the test, he came to me and said something was crooked on her face. Finally he discovered it was her eyebrows. One was arched and the other straight.
'Why don't you make them both straight?' he wanted to know.
   I told him I hadn’t, and I wouldn’t, because the unbalanced brows made her face more interesting. Moreover they were natural. She had a habit of lifting one brow, which arched it. And I wanted it to remain that way. It wasn’t perfection — but it gave her a fine impish quality. Finally Korda agreed.
  And between us, don’t you think Vivien Leigh looks all right these days? And those eyebrows are still crooked! Frequently little irregularities like these can be turned into assets.” (Guy Pearce, make-up artist)

2 weeks ago 80 notes


4 weeks ago 37 notes


1st
July
51 notes
Reblog
4 weeks ago 51 notes


markadnum:

Olivier & Leigh and the dream of air travel.

4 weeks ago 40 notes


griruxx:

Interviewer: Didn’t the sudden rush of fame and offers that followed Gone With the Wind sweep you off your feet?
Vivien Leigh: “No. Why should it? After all I was 26 and I knew I did not want to be a film star. I had had sudden fame before when I was 19 and in ‘Mask of Virtue’ and if that didn’t affect me then, why should it at 26?”

4 weeks ago 293 notes


“My horoscope was done for me three months ago and it said, ‘You’ll be lonely’ and look how right it turned out to be. I was born on Nov. 5 so I’m a Scorpio and under that sign Scorpios burn themselves out and eat themselves up and they are careless about themselves – like me.” (Vivien Leigh, 1960)

4 weeks ago 35 notes


26th
June
73 notes
Reblog
  “She was a romantic young woman, blossoming with a new sexuality and possessing a rare, breathtaking beauty that caused strangers on the street to turn and stare. The grace of her slim, delicate body, the chiseled perfection of her oval face, the startling vividness of her gray-green-blue eyes, the dazzling whiteness of her skin and the long graceful curve of her neck gave her the look of a Modigliani sculpture.” (Anne Edwards)

  “She was a romantic young woman, blossoming with a new sexuality and possessing a rare, breathtaking beauty that caused strangers on the street to turn and stare. The grace of her slim, delicate body, the chiseled perfection of her oval face, the startling vividness of her gray-green-blue eyes, the dazzling whiteness of her skin and the long graceful curve of her neck gave her the look of a Modigliani sculpture.” (Anne Edwards)

1 month ago 73 notes


26th
June
51 notes
Reblog
   “It is very easy to misunderstand Vivien Leigh. She looks like an imaginative painter’s version of The Spirit of Water Lilies. She is long-stemmed and slender and her skin has the luminous look of moonlight in a still lake; there is no particular reason why anyone’s eyelashes should be as long as hers, and her features are, in general, the sort of assembly turned out by the manufacturing angel on a day when he was bucking for a Christmas bonus.    Probably poems have been written about her. There remains no real reason why a versifier should confine himself to the June-moon routine when it is feasible to rhyme Leigh with holy gee, while introducing ‘alabaster’ and ‘Dresden’ in proper meter.    It is easy, we repeat, to misunderstand Vivien Leigh. Because she gives the appearance of physical fragility and spiritual wingedness, one can easily miss the fact that she is really a sixteen-cylinder motor installed in ectoplasm; that she is a three-hundred-watt globe installed in a pastel paper Japanese lantern; that she is a four-alarm fire in a chiffon factory.” (1950s press)

   “It is very easy to misunderstand Vivien Leigh. She looks like an imaginative painter’s version of The Spirit of Water Lilies. She is long-stemmed and slender and her skin has the luminous look of moonlight in a still lake; there is no particular reason why anyone’s eyelashes should be as long as hers, and her features are, in general, the sort of assembly turned out by the manufacturing angel on a day when he was bucking for a Christmas bonus.
   Probably poems have been written about her. There remains no real reason why a versifier should confine himself to the June-moon routine when it is feasible to rhyme Leigh with holy gee, while introducing ‘alabaster’ and ‘Dresden’ in proper meter.
   It is easy, we repeat, to misunderstand Vivien Leigh. Because she gives the appearance of physical fragility and spiritual wingedness, one can easily miss the fact that she is really a sixteen-cylinder motor installed in ectoplasm; that she is a three-hundred-watt globe installed in a pastel paper Japanese lantern; that she is a four-alarm fire in a chiffon factory.” (1950s press)

1 month ago 51 notes